14 FEB

2017 CPF Winter Board Meeting

The CPF board of directors will meet on Wednesday, March 8, 2017 beginning at 8:30 a.m. at the Hyatt Regency on L Street in Sacramento. A buffet breakfast will be served in the Ventura Room before the meeting beginning at 7:30 a.m. The board of directors meeting will be in the Big Sur Room. Both rooms are on the 2nd Floor.
On Tuesday March 7, 2017 there will be a wine and appetizer reception at Cafeteria 15 L, which is near the hotel. The reception will begin at 6:00 p.m. and will benefit the CPF state and federal PACS.  There is a $100 per person contribution to attend. To RSVP for the meeting, reception and breakfast, and to make a room reservation, if needed, please call Sandy at (209) 576-6355 or email sandy@cpif.org

14 FEB

US egg producers predict not all hens cage free by 2025

The big story in the U.S. egg industry in 2016 was the number of cage-free purchase pledges made by major retail and foodservice shell egg purchasers, and similar pledges by foodservice and food companies regarding egg products purchases. Most of these cage-free shell egg and egg product purchase pledges are due to take effect in 2025. In a report released on January 9, 2017, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) estimated that the number of cage-free egg layers housed in the U.S. had increased to 37.6 million by December 2016, with 14.1 million of these hens being certified organic. Read more

14 FEB

Fresh eggs and – Preparation H – for residents and backyard chickens

The five chickens that live behind Mark Verschell’s stately Takoma Park , Md., Victorian have an enviable existence, for birds. Their accommodations are a heated, trailer-style coop. Their enclosure protects them from predators and is adorned with shiny compact discs to deter feed-stealing sparrows. They snack on dried mealworms and fresh grapes. Their water contains a bit of apple cider vinegar to help balance pH levels and smooth digestion. But even hens leading comfortable lives can have health issues, a fact Verschell confronted when he spotted a bright red protrusion on the nether regions of Ethel, the largest and blondest of his family’s flock. Read more

14 FEB

HPAI toll continues to rise in Asia, Germany

Bird culls in the wake of the months-long outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) are continuing as Asian nations report higher cull figures and Germany also posts increasing bird deaths in the last three months.

Officials in South Korea announced that more than 33 million birds have been culled since November, more than double the record 13.96 million birds destroyed in an HPAI outbreak in 2014, according to several local media reports. The latest outbreaks have affected an estimated 340 farms in South Korea and the virus has resurfaced after appearing to abate in early February, according to the Korea Times. Compensation for the lost poultry is expected to reach $227.1 million, nearly three times the amount the government paid in the wake of the 2014 outbreaks.
Read more

11 FEB

Modesto plant supplies squab, and it’s not your common pigeon

Chinese people launched the Year of the Rooster on Saturday, with help from a Modesto business that deals in a quite another kind of poultry. Squab Producers of California is at its busiest for Chinese New Year gatherings in San Francisco and other locales. The 34-employee plant just east of Crows Landing Road is the nation’s largest supplier of the young pigeons, raised on 65 farms from Fresno to Red Bluff.

“It’s one of the tastiest, tenderest meats that you can get,” President Dalton Rasmussen said Friday at a farm southwest of Turlock. He spoke over the cooing of a few thousand squab housed in open-sided barns over their 30-day lives. Read more

11 FEB

Chicken farmers say processors treat them like servants

Former chicken farmers in five states have filed a federal lawsuit accusing a handful of giant poultry processing companies that dominate the industry of treating farmers who raise the chickens like indentured servants and colluding to fix prices paid to them. The farmers located in Alabama, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma and Texas allege that the contract grower system created by Tyson Foods, Pilgrim’s Pride, Perdue Farms, Koch Foods, and Sanderson Farms pushed them deep into debt to build and maintain chicken barns to meet company demands.
Read more

11 FEB

Bird flu deaths bring live poultry market ban in Hunan province

Live poultry sales are being shut down in China’s central Hunan province because one strain of bird flu has turned deadly for people. Americans are being cautioned about the outbreak, but are not being warned against travel to Hunan.

China is temporarily closing the live poultry markets in Hunan because five deaths are now attributed to the H7N9 avian flue strain. Hunan is a mountainous province in southern China, best known for being home of Mao Zedong, known as Chairman Mao. Read more

07 FEB

New GIPSA rule delayed for two months

The effective date for a new Agriculture Department rule that sets standards of proof for market practices in the livestock and poultry industry has been delayed two months until April 22. The delay carries out a White House order issued the day President Trump took office to allow for review of rules that were implemented in the final weeks of the Obama administration.  The interim final rule that USDA’s Grain Inspection and Packers and Stockyards Administration (GIPSA) released in December was originally scheduled to take effect Feb. 21. An announcement posted Monday both delayed the effective date and said the agency would take public comment on the rule until March 24.  Read more

07 FEB

Safer Salmonella control in poultry feed

Salmonella in feed is one of the key causes of colonization in poultry. Enterobacteriaceae such as Salmonella can be present in the entire feed production process, from the raw materials all the way through to the final feed. Salmonella may then be passed on to consumers. Because of this, feed millers and integrators aiming to ensure high feed quality standards, need to demonstrate they have an effective Salmonella control program.  Read more

07 FEB

Did someone say food fight? U.S. farmers – and especially those in California – fret over a possible trade war

It took Donald Trump 71 days to settle on an Agriculture secretary after winning the presidency. It took him 72 hours after that to unsettle much of the agriculture industry.  First, the freshly inaugurated president withdrew from the Trans-Pacific Partnership treaty, a 12-nation pact that was expected to boost U.S. agricultural exports by more than $7 billion annually over the coming decades, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.  Then, Press Secretary Sean Spicer said the president was thinking about financing his long-promised southern border wall with a 20% tax on “imports from deficit countries, like Mexico.” Read more

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